Painting scenery – Grattage http://grattage.info/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 18:09:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://grattage.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Painting scenery – Grattage http://grattage.info/ 32 32 6 black artists you need to know who are part of Houston’s booming art scene https://grattage.info/6-black-artists-you-need-to-know-who-are-part-of-houstons-booming-art-scene/ https://grattage.info/6-black-artists-you-need-to-know-who-are-part-of-houstons-booming-art-scene/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 18:05:49 +0000 https://grattage.info/6-black-artists-you-need-to-know-who-are-part-of-houstons-booming-art-scene/ Monique Welch, Personal editor November 2, 2021 1of6 Akaimi Davis, 45, is an intuitive artist who paints, designs goods digitally from her works. She calls Houston her second home with her base in San Antonio and travels across Texas exhibiting and selling her work. Jasmine williamsShow moreShow less 2of6 Michael “maddkyng” Temple, 29, entered the […]]]>

Photo by Monique Welch

From acrylic paint and merchandise to digital art and graphic design, black artists are making their mark on Houston’s thriving art scene.

Many take influence from prominent historical artists like Frida Kahlo to Jean-Michel Basquiat, a renowned artist of the 80s, whose work Kanye West also admires.

Here are 6 black artists you should know from Houston’s booming scene.


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Artstra to host eighth Clark County Open Studios tour https://grattage.info/artstra-to-host-eighth-clark-county-open-studios-tour/ https://grattage.info/artstra-to-host-eighth-clark-county-open-studios-tour/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 00:46:19 +0000 https://grattage.info/artstra-to-host-eighth-clark-county-open-studios-tour/ Sebastian Rubino / sebastian@thereflector.com After a one-year hiatus, the nonprofit Artsstra will host the eighth Clark County Open Studio Tour from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on November 6 and 7. The popular self-guided tour celebrates the creativity of local artists and artisans as they open their doors to the public. “This is an opportunity […]]]>

Sebastian Rubino / sebastian@thereflector.com

After a one-year hiatus, the nonprofit Artsstra will host the eighth Clark County Open Studio Tour from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on November 6 and 7.

The popular self-guided tour celebrates the creativity of local artists and artisans as they open their doors to the public.

“This is an opportunity for the community to come out and experience the life of an artist,” said Jennifer Williams, director of Open Studios. “With so many different types of artists, there is something for everyone.”

Williams was inspired to launch the event in 2013 after attending Artstra’s Arts and Culture Summit the previous year. The community was invited to discuss the art and what they wanted to see.

As Williams often took her friends to other people’s studios for fun, she decided that a larger event of a similar nature was needed in the community, as it allows artists to show their work to a wider audience. .

“The real reason I did it was that I accidentally met a few artists through different means such as Michelle Allen,” Williams said. “She’s been an artist in the community for 20 years and so have I, and we never crossed paths or had a clue what each other’s art was like. The point of all of this is therefore for Open Studios to discover the incredible artistic community that we have here. There have always been artists here, but no one knew them.

An example of an artist featured on the tour is Ann Fleming, who just moved from White Salmon to Ridgefield. She is a bronze sculptor, ceramicist and painter whose painting “Release Peace” was featured in the marketing material for the Open Studios Tour. Williams felt the image was inspiring for this year.

Other examples include Connie Ford, who weaves baskets using sweetgrass, red and yellow cedar, willow, driftwood, bark, and garden cuttings. Then there is Anne Gilmour, who has her workshop on a farm. Gilmour collects the wool from the sheep she raises, which she later puts on and weaves.

Although she hasn’t been a featured artist on recent tours, Williams will be a participant again this year as she shows off her paintings of environmental landscapes.

“I haven’t opened my studio in four years because I just painted in my galleries and I’ve been too busy running the tour,” Williams said. “I am very happy to be back on tour this year as a participant and look forward to reconnecting with the community.”

Not only are the works of art worth highlighting, but their location is a fun sight in itself. Williams mentioned Mary Grout, who lives by the Lewis River in Woodland and makes ceramics.

“So you don’t just see their art, but you get the whole thing,” Williams said.

Since there are 50 featured artists scattered around Clark County, Williams suggests looking at the Artist Directory map on the Artstra website to find artists located near where the attendee lives. the tour.

“Who knows, maybe your neighbor is an artist and you’ve never known him,” she said.

Another way to narrow down the options, Williams said, is for participants to go online to see the work they are interested in by looking at the category filters on Artstra’s artist page featured on their website.

For example, someone who has taken a glassmaking course and wants to learn more, can go online to see who makes glass art. For those who aren’t comfortable navigating the map online, Williams said people can turn the map into a PDF and print it.

The Open Studios Artist List, which contains the filters, can be found online at artstra.org/2021-open-studios-artists.

The artist directory map is available online at tinyurl.com/e5n5fe8v.


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“Painting by numbers” by Diana Seave Greenwald | Culture & Leisure https://grattage.info/painting-by-numbers-by-diana-seave-greenwald-culture-leisure/ https://grattage.info/painting-by-numbers-by-diana-seave-greenwald-culture-leisure/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 00:45:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/painting-by-numbers-by-diana-seave-greenwald-culture-leisure/ “Painting by Numbers, Data-Driven Histories of Nineteenth-Century Art” sounds like you’re about to learn how to apply color to a line art with subdivided number spaces, indicating where to insert the numbered hues – This is not the case. This volume takes a look at artists of the past who turned to portraiture, landscape and […]]]>

“Painting by Numbers, Data-Driven Histories of Nineteenth-Century Art” sounds like you’re about to learn how to apply color to a line art with subdivided number spaces, indicating where to insert the numbered hues – This is not the case. This volume takes a look at artists of the past who turned to portraiture, landscape and genre, but why? As a painter, I think it’s important to understand where you stand in the art’s timeline, even if the gravel is slippery at times and your foot becomes unstable. Did artists from another era choose categories on a whim or were they influenced by the era and the environment in which they lived? Greenwald, art historian and economist, has researched and presented graphics, which can be intimidating. Don’t worry, his story is very clear. I recommend reading the text first and then going back to the data. Four tables in this book provide a visual explanation.






Les Glaneuses, 1857, by Jean-François Millet


‘Les glaneuses’, 1857, by Jean-François Millet, who wrote, “Paris, black, muddy, smoky”, is an example of a 19th century French painting, free from the grime and poverty of urban Paris (Greenwald 52). The industrial revolution gave artists the railroad to work in the countryside and easily return to network with their colleagues and metropolitan merchants. While this image shows pristine horizons, it also depicts haggard peasant women picking up post-harvest leftovers for personal survival. Artists like Millet portrayed the grim realities of modern farming communities, disturbing a thriving urban audience, who needed to come true (Greenwald 55, 82). Agriculture and mechanized factories not only overworked the lower classes, but early technologies left communities in abject poverty that some with age-old skills could not assimilate. The ambiguities of the modern world were visibly manifested thanks to Millet.






KMBT_C224e-20211031200335

Guerrilla Girls, 1989



“Do women have to be naked to enter the Met. Museum ? Less than 5% of the artists in the Modern sections are women, but 85% of the nudes are women ”, 1989, is a poster for Guerilla Girls (Greenwald 85). The inclusion of this coin may confuse readers, as it does not date from the 18th or 19th century. Yet it is a reminder that today’s women in the art world still lag behind their male counterparts. In addition to being penalized for being a woman, maintaining a household, raising children, taking a second job and accumulating less money, women artists continue to derail. Traditionally, women tended to make smaller works, using pencils and watercolors, which could easily be picked up / cleaned up between other pressing responsibilities.

Some affluent women like Mary Cassatt found the European aesthetic atmosphere more welcoming. There was a colony of American female sculptors in Rome (Greenwald 102). Upon returning home, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts began admitting women in 1844, but renting a studio was considered inappropriate. Women were excluded from art clubs reserved for men; in 1866, the Women’s National Art Association opened in Philadelphia (Greenwald 87, 88, 92, 93 101). Women continue to lack representation of merchants, which is why they still gravitate towards art cooperatives and show in cafes.






Fruits of Temptation, 1857, by Lilly Martin Spencer

Fruits of Temptation, 1857, by Lilly Martin Spencer


‘Fruits of Temptation’, 1857, by Lilly Martin Spencer, is a genre painting, showing domesticity, although staged. Spencer was raised by progressive English parents who immigrated to Ohio. In 1844, she moved to New Jersey with her Irish husband, a tailor by trade, who became her shop assistant, helping to raise 13 children – 7 of whom survived to adulthood (Greenwald 103 104) . Highly unusual for being the breadwinner, Spencer became the most famous American artist of the mid-19th century, but felt underpaid. She wrote: “A progressive family life could nurture her professional ambition and facilitate her career, but did not protect her from the heavy time demands and professional repercussions of motherhood (Greenwald 104, 105)”. Spencer used his family as the subject, while his male contemporaries had more choices in rendering what was in fashion: patrician portraits and landscapes. Some would argue that Spencer was not the most famous female painter of her time, which could explain why so many works have been lost.






The Family of Sir William Young, 1767-69, by Johannes Zoffany

The Family of Sir William Young, 1767-69, by Johannes Zoffany


‘The Family of Sir William Young’, 1767-1769, by Johannes Zoffany, shows a prosperous English family on their estate. Their elegant brocades, pets and healthy children, sit under an ornamental tree adjacent to the wide stone staircase, the centerpiece of a stately home. Young was the son of a Caribbean doctor / planter. The family acquires wealth which allows entry into the British aristocracy (Greenwald 150). In the background, a black male figure, servant and trope of colonial conquests, smiles artificially, stabilizing those who ride horses. Greenwald concludes that painting the Empire was much less popular than making the homeland – “the green and pleasant land of England”, even though Britain, until World War I, controlled a quarter of the land. terrestrial world (Greenwald 115 116). According to Beth Fowkes Tobin, when Empire was occasionally depicted, the paintings “perform ideological works, in part, by depicting imperialism in such a way that the appropriation of land, resources, labor and culture takes place. transforms into something aesthetic and morally satisfying (Greenwald 121,122). A few artists have succeeded in painting the details of Empire. Egypt and India, given their economic importance, were the most represented colonial spaces (Greenwald 130,131). An excuse for not painting the Empire was that it cost artists too much to travel to remote places deemed wild (Greenwald 127). With acclaim from art critic John Ruskin and painter Thomas Gainsborough, “British artists engage in what they can directly observe and the depiction of English landscapes has indeed become a point of national pride (Greenwald 129). ”

At the end of “Painting by Numbers”, Greenwald decides that 18th and 19th century institutions like the Royal Academy of Great Britain were justified in not showing the cruel realities of what was going on regularly in the colonies (Greenwald 151) . While it is true that British art buyers invested in and profited from colonial trade, as did dealers and institutions, they were all cowardly wimps, which Greenwald should have recognized. “Painting by Numbers” was released in 2021 after “Black Lives Matter” and the “Me-Too Movement” which forced museums and universities to reconsider what and how they show art, as well as who is funding the process. Nonetheless, this book contains poignant historical information for painters, especially women artists, who strive to paint the avant-garde, in the hope of showing in fair places. Some artists continue to be limited by money, travel, studio space, art material, genre and therefore can only render backyard subjects.

Mini detective: “Painting by Numbers” by Diana Seave Greenwald is available on Amazon. Thanks – Jodi Price, Princeton University Press, for providing this book.

Jean Bundy is a writer / painter living in Anchorage and sits on the board of directors of IAIS-International.


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The Roswell, New Mexico scene that went too far https://grattage.info/the-roswell-new-mexico-scene-that-went-too-far/ https://grattage.info/the-roswell-new-mexico-scene-that-went-too-far/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 00:43:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/the-roswell-new-mexico-scene-that-went-too-far/ At this point in the season, fans are fully aware that Alex is struggling with his gay identity. Through geek lair, it is noted that Alex seeks to “find that pride and self-esteem that he was never able to grow in an abusive home or in the military.” In this case, the particular scene that […]]]>

At this point in the season, fans are fully aware that Alex is struggling with his gay identity. Through geek lair, it is noted that Alex seeks to “find that pride and self-esteem that he was never able to grow in an abusive home or in the military.” In this case, the particular scene that went too far involves a threesome that Maria essentially initiates between Alex, Michael, and herself.

The problem here is that Maria oversteps Alex’s own limits after he made it clear that he wanted to leave before accepting her. Most likely, the showrunners wanted to portray polyamory as something that could be explored without shame and without painting Maria as the villain for the job. But as a user in the PrimeTimer forum commented, the execution was not only problematic but out of character for Maria. “I don’t think Maria would ever have done this if Alex had expressed her unease… Alex has repeatedly referred to himself as gay, not bisexual, pansexual or whatever.”

Another user Bloga commented, “This whole threesome thing was just a lazy way to solve the problems between the three of them.” However, to defend Maria, a user Feather hat commented: “Maria could have legitimately thought it was a good idea for the three of them and it exploded in their faces instead.”

It’s obvious to fans that Michael and Alex are soul mates, but it was Maria and Michael who got together in the episode while Alex parted ways with Michael the next morning. “Sex and Candy” really didn’t mean much and, on the contrary, left fans bowled over by Alex’s discomfort and confused about the characters’ motivations.


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MCU filmed first sex scene for Eternals, and director Chloe Zhao explains why https://grattage.info/mcu-filmed-first-sex-scene-for-eternals-and-director-chloe-zhao-explains-why/ https://grattage.info/mcu-filmed-first-sex-scene-for-eternals-and-director-chloe-zhao-explains-why/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 23:42:08 +0000 https://grattage.info/mcu-filmed-first-sex-scene-for-eternals-and-director-chloe-zhao-explains-why/ As Marvel enters Phase Four, the new films are pushing the boundaries in a variety of ways. Eternals This strategy is already being followed by launching the MCU’s first gay protagonist, but there is more going on in the expected film. The Marvel blockbuster will also feature the MCU’s first foray into some sensitive adult […]]]>

As Marvel enters Phase Four, the new films are pushing the boundaries in a variety of ways. Eternals This strategy is already being followed by launching the MCU’s first gay protagonist, but there is more going on in the expected film. The Marvel blockbuster will also feature the MCU’s first foray into some sensitive adult situations, courtesy of director Chloe Zhao. The Eternals The filmmaker recently revealed what led to Marvel’s first sex scene in the ensemble film.

Having an intimate moment between the characters seems plausible given the possible love triangle in Eternals. Of course, Chloe Zhao hasn’t revealed who will be involved in the love scene. Shades of Love predicts that something special will happen given Zhao’s visionary cinema. Oscar winner said IndieWire on what the sex scene will mean for the entire MCU.

From this moment to what you see on the screen, there has certainly been a lot of talk about how to do this. But I think the desire to do something different is a very natural desire in Marvel Studios’ current situation. I think it’s like westerns are stepping into the revisionist period of the ’70s. I think it happens to superhero movies – or at least we’re at the limit. And so, these scenes just started to happen naturally.


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Adult tic torment: a man finds refuge at the easel https://grattage.info/adult-tic-torment-a-man-finds-refuge-at-the-easel/ https://grattage.info/adult-tic-torment-a-man-finds-refuge-at-the-easel/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 21:56:57 +0000 https://grattage.info/adult-tic-torment-a-man-finds-refuge-at-the-easel/ OTTAWA – Five years after it began, a man from Arnprior continues to struggle with his poor health. Don Lacasse, 50, suffers from adult tic syndrome, a disease causing daily episodes of uncontrollable screaming and unpredictable movements. “I had episodes where I screamed for three days in a row and couldn’t stop,” Lacasse said. It […]]]>

OTTAWA – Five years after it began, a man from Arnprior continues to struggle with his poor health.

Don Lacasse, 50, suffers from adult tic syndrome, a disease causing daily episodes of uncontrollable screaming and unpredictable movements.

“I had episodes where I screamed for three days in a row and couldn’t stop,” Lacasse said.

It all started in 2016. Lacasse worked in an Arnprior auto parts shop and felt inexplicably exhausted.

“More and more difficult to just get out of bed and get to work.”

Soon after, he began to pass out, choke, and sweat profusely.

“There were so many symptoms associated with my illness that it left the doctors in awe,” Lacasse said.

Doctors diagnosed Lacasse with adult tic disorder.

“When you’re a kid, 12, they call her Tourette. After the age of 12, they call it adult tic syndrome, ”he said.

Lacasse says there is a long list of symptoms that are plaguing his health. It is not certain that they are directly linked to his syndrome.

He says light breezes can bring him to his knees. He is very sensitive to the sun. His body feels like it is running on electricity.

“It starts in my head and it cascades like a coldness over my body. I feel like people hit me over and over again with a bucket of cold water, ”Lacasse said.

In an effort to rule out other illnesses that could also harm his health, Lacasse said he had undergone a battery of medical tests for MS, Parkinson’s disease, heavy metals, Lyme disease and other autoimmune diseases. He says those tests all came back negative.

Lacasse had to give up his driver’s license and quit his job.

To pass the time, when he is doing well enough, Lacasse has taken to painting.

“It was my savior. That’s about all I can do, ”he said.

“I always wanted to put a painting on canvas before leaving this world. My wife bought me a canvas, paints and brushes and I hung up straight away.

Lacasse paints landscapes on boards with living edges and black and white portraits of people and animals.

His most popular work, however, is a series of paintings he calls “Bad Animals,” creatures that smoke marijuana.

Bad animals

“They were instantly popular. I did sixteen paintings in June alone, ”he said.

The fun portraits, mostly finger painted, have captured the imaginations of many here in Canada, including several Ontario cannabis stores in Eastern Ontario and a gallery in the United States.

“I hope to ship a bunch of my original ‘Bad Animals’ to a gallery in New York soon and sell my stuff there.”

His “Bad Animals” are also available on t-shirts and sweatshirts.

For the husband, the father and the grandfather, painting is a precious respite from the pain and unpredictability of his condition.

“It’s like holding a baby and rocking it. This total calm is coming upon you, ”said Lacasse.

Although his condition drastically changed his world, he says it gave him a more creative world as well. And for that he is grateful.

“It was a difficult task, but I get lost in my works of art. It really helps the day go by and makes a lot of people happy.

The art of Don Lacasse can be seen on Instagram @fresh_prints_of_craig_st



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Artist Changes Frannie’s Landscape with New Art Installations | New https://grattage.info/artist-changes-frannies-landscape-with-new-art-installations-new/ https://grattage.info/artist-changes-frannies-landscape-with-new-art-installations-new/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 21:47:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/artist-changes-frannies-landscape-with-new-art-installations-new/ POWELL – An artist in the area by the pseudonym Greg Wymoing – no, that’s not a typo – wants you to think about it. And smile. He recently installed a sculpture – “Hull’s Half Acre: A Dozen Dinghies in the Desert” – on a hill outside of Frannie. Overlooking US Highway 310, the 12 […]]]>

POWELL – An artist in the area by the pseudonym Greg Wymoing – no, that’s not a typo – wants you to think about it. And smile.

He recently installed a sculpture – “Hull’s Half Acre: A Dozen Dinghies in the Desert” – on a hill outside of Frannie. Overlooking US Highway 310, the 12 recycled motorboats are positioned at their ends, embodied as a group. It caught the eyes and wonder of many passers-by in Wyoming’s northernmost enclave.

The sculpture sits next to a faded old Cadillac, older firefighting equipment, and a bright green John Deere tractor with yellow accessories.

They are also sculptures, according to the artist.

Wymoing uses the oddly spelled pseudonym because he enjoys his privacy. But he’s a longtime high desert businessman also known as Bridger’s Riley Cooke.

He set up the sculpture garden on the hill to convey messages, he said in an interview with the property last week. Some are political statements, he said, “but not like that Trump and Biden bullshit.”

“I want people to stop and think. I want older generations to engage in conversations with younger people. And if I can start to smile, I have done my job, ”he said.

“Dinghies” are not about boats, he said.

“It’s about spending time with family and friends,” Cooke said. “Boating is family time. Never miss the opportunity to create memories.

The Cadillac and the trailer are a tribute to cowboys.

“In the days before decent 4×4 pickup trucks, livestock buyers pulled their horse trailers with a Cadillac, the car of choice,” he explained. “They would stop on a hill to find the car after driving through unfamiliar and open beaches, while looking at cattle to buy. This cowboy never returned. And with it, the handshake, kindness to others and common sense are gone. We pray for his quick return. The company desperately needs the traits it has with it.

The tractor is a tribute to agricultural producers.

“Food. It’s from the refrigerator. It’s from the store,” Cooke said. “Stop. You kill me. It comes from the family farm. Yes. 1.3% of the American workforce feeds us all. Unbelievable. As we thank our military, first responders and the police as it should be. I think we should add the American farm family.

Hull’s Half Acre is a play about Hell’s Half Acre, the otherworldly geological quirk near Casper.

The boats are doing exactly what Cooke had hoped for: initiating conversations. Reviews are mixed, but Marty Roedel, a resident of Frannie, likes what she sees.

“It will make people slow down to watch,” she said, relaxing with friends at the Frannie Bar. “I like it.”

Garrett Pike also likes the addition to the horizon.

“If you take the time to look at the boats, it looks like the rays of the sun,” he said.

Cooke says the sculpture is best seen at sunset, when the sky is full of color.

Northwest College student Kelsey Herman spotted them just before sunset, as she passed Frannie on her way back to Powell from Billings.

“I was like ‘Oh my God, these are boats’,” she recalls. “I’ve never seen anything like it.”

It was too late for the photography communication student to get a photo, so she returned a few days later. Herman wanted to take a closer look and reached half of the boats before Cooke pulled into the parking lot, honked and called him.

While Cooke wants to share his art with the world, he doesn’t want people encroaching on his property. Neighbors are also concerned that roads and private roads will be overcrowded with people wanting to walk to the top or use their land for another vantage point. It is also illegal to gain access to private rail property anywhere other than a designated pedestrian or highway crossing, according to the US Department of Transportation. Access to the sculpture is not at a legal crossing point.

When Cooke pulled over, “I felt like I was freaking out that I was going to jail or the cops calling me,” Herman recalls.

As it turned out, Cooke wasn’t there to stop him, although he reminded him of the rules of railroads and private property.

“He was like the sweetest human I have ever spoken to,” Herman said. “He was delighted that I was here just to take in the beauty of his art and photograph it and mix my view of art with his view of art – like, combine the two.”

She was amazed at his commitment to his vision.

Cooke collected boats for over a decade before installing the sculpture. Not only was it difficult to put them in the arrangement he wanted, but it was not easy to lug big boats in the desert. He had help. Among those who helped, her son James played a big part in the work to set up the facilities. But that was Cooke’s whole idea, James said.

“I just do as he tells me.”

The artist is also working on motorcycle and 9/11 themed exhibitions and is not done with the open-air gallery. He plans to direct people to a parking lot with signage available explaining the facilities. He also plans to install a frame so people can line up art for photos.

“A lot of people think the art is framed and hung on a white wall,” he explained. “So we’re going to go ahead and put a big thing in there with the frame, some wrapper, and the name and you can step back, take a picture through the hole in the boat or whatever.”

Cooke is moving forward with his project, unafraid of what people think of his vision. He can explain his inspiration for each piece precisely, due to the time he spent conceiving the ideas – essentially the definition of conceptual art, which is art for which the idea (or concept) behind l The work is more important than the finished art object.

Despite everything, Cooke is uncomfortable being called an artist.

“I’m on the verge of eccentric – more than not,” he said, struggling aloud. “Maybe I’m just an eccentric artist.”


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The new exhibition is the first to fully examine the impact of southern European sites on Picasso https://grattage.info/the-new-exhibition-is-the-first-to-fully-examine-the-impact-of-southern-european-sites-on-picasso/ https://grattage.info/the-new-exhibition-is-the-first-to-fully-examine-the-impact-of-southern-european-sites-on-picasso/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 18:52:56 +0000 https://grattage.info/the-new-exhibition-is-the-first-to-fully-examine-the-impact-of-southern-european-sites-on-picasso/ PICASSO, Le Baiser Mougins, October 26, 1969. Oil on canvas. Musée national Picasso-Paris Dation Pablo Picasso, 1979. MP220 © 2021 Succession Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York This winter, the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida offers a celebration of Pablo Picasso’s flourishing creativity in southern France and northern Spain. Organized by […]]]>

PICASSO, Le Baiser Mougins, October 26, 1969. Oil on canvas. Musée national Picasso-Paris Dation Pablo Picasso, 1979. MP220 © 2021 Succession Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

This winter, the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida offers a celebration of Pablo Picasso’s flourishing creativity in southern France and northern Spain. Organized by the Musée Dalí in collaboration with the Musée national Picasso-Paris, Picasso and the lure of the south offers a fascinating new avenue for understanding Picasso’s artistic spirit through the prism of this unique geographical area. Some of Pablo Picasso’s most creative periods took place during summer stays in the mountain and coastal communities of the Spanish and French border, including Céret, Sorgues, Vallauris, Horta de Ebro and Cadaqués.. The exhibition features paintings, drawings and collages – about half of which have never been seen in the United States – from the Musée national Picasso-Paris, as well as the Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection, New York. The Dalí Museum is the only place in the world to present this exhibition, which is curated by Dr William Jeffett, Curator of Special Exhibitions at the Dalí Museum.

“Picasso created accomplished works of art that drew inspiration from the cultures of this shared southern region, leading viewers to explore its rich appeal and reflect on the notion of border regions in a more universal way,” said Dr Hank Hine, executive director of The Dalí. “Picasso and the lure of the south is emblematic of the accessible and multi-layered international projects that The Dalí is behind to enlighten our public from near and far.

Born in Malaga, Spain, in 1881, Picasso spent his formative years in Barcelona, ​​where he learned to speak Catalan. In the many places where he lived, worked and visited across the Pyrenees and the Mediterranean, Picasso was inspired by the reliefs, rituals and customs of the region. Picasso and the lure of the south presents an exceptional selection of portraits, still lifes, figurative studies and landscapes dating from 1909 to 1972 which reflect the relationships of Picasso’s entire career with the provinces of his homeland and the south of France.

PICASSO, Musician Mougins, May 26, 1972. Oil on canvas. Musée national Picasso-Paris Dation Pablo Picasso, 1979. MP229 © 2021 Succession Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The exhibition is divided into four thematic sections which retrace the importance of the geographical region for Picasso’s work and heritage.

The birth of cubism presents a selection of drawings and collages that explain how specific places in northern Spain and southern France – far from the big cities of Paris and Barcelona – inspired the first experiments and evolutions of Picasso’s cubism. Images of village life, mountain views, and musicians feature prominently, including The oil mill (1909) and Studies of a boat (1910), a typical Catalan fishing boat rendered with cross hatching.

From cubism to realism examines Picasso’s shift to a more playful approach to Cubist idioms, and examines how the southern environment profoundly influenced his landscapes, still lifes, and depictions of cafe regulars. Landscape of Juan-les-Pins (1920) depicts houses and gardens through an explosion of color, light and airy joie de vivre that retains some elements of Cubism but in a whole new way.

In the third section, Southern Corridas – Bullfighting, the exhibition maps Picasso’s fascination with bullfighting from the youngest age. It is perhaps the most persistent subject of his long life as an artist, the bull representing a personal and political symbol. In the painting Bullfight (most likely executed in late December 1923 or early January 1924), Picasso focuses on the conflict between the bull and the horse, as well as the death of the matador, with an early surreal concern for both the passionate drama and the closeness of the dead.

The exhibition ends with Surrealism and beyond, when Picasso’s painting in the 1930s evolved into a deep engagement with surrealism. Although he was never an official member of the Surrealist group, largely because his work was grounded in lived experience, Picasso developed a rich synthesis of the southern palette and glow that was imbued with surrealist motifs of dreams and imagination.

Among the masterpieces in the exhibition that have never been exhibited in the United States are the canvases Portrait of Madame Rosenberg and her daughter (1918), a tour de force of naturalism and a return to order associated with classicism, tradition and Mediterranean culture; Woman at the buffet (1936); and The kiss (1969), in which a bald and bearded character, avatar of the artist, is locked in a kiss with a brunette woman.

The exhibition is accompanied by a 240-page illustrated catalog edited by Ludion, with essays by the curator, William Jeffett, and Emilia Philippot, head of collections at the Musée national Picasso-Paris.

Timed tickets with advance purchase are required to visit the Dalí. Picasso and the lure of the south is included in the entrance fee to the Dalí Museum. Tickets for the exhibition period will be available by December 30, 2021 at TheDali.org.


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Bob Thompson’s exhibition explores his brilliant works from a curtailed career https://grattage.info/bob-thompsons-exhibition-explores-his-brilliant-works-from-a-curtailed-career/ https://grattage.info/bob-thompsons-exhibition-explores-his-brilliant-works-from-a-curtailed-career/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 18:52:56 +0000 https://grattage.info/bob-thompsons-exhibition-explores-his-brilliant-works-from-a-curtailed-career/ Bob Thompson, “Garden of Music”, 1960. Oil on canvas. 79 1/2 × 143 in. (201.9 × 363.2 cm). Wadsworth Atheneum Art Museum, Hartford, Connecticut. The Ella Gallup Sumner and Mary Catlin Sumner Collection fonds. © Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York. Photo: Allen Phillips / Wadsworth Atheneum Bob Thompson in his studio in Rivington Street, […]]]>
Bob Thompson, “Garden of Music”, 1960. Oil on canvas. 79 1/2 × 143 in. (201.9 × 363.2 cm). Wadsworth Atheneum Art Museum, Hartford, Connecticut. The Ella Gallup Sumner and Mary Catlin Sumner Collection fonds. © Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York. Photo: Allen Phillips / Wadsworth Atheneum
Bob Thompson in his studio in Rivington Street, NY, c. 1964. © Charles Rotmil

“It was all totally my imagination from a far away place.” – Bob Thompson

A major traveling exhibition offers a rich reflection on a visionary African-American painter. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, Bob Thompson (1937-1966) received critical acclaim in the late 1950s for his paintings of figurative complexity and chromatic intensity. Bob Thompson: This house is mine borrows its name from a tiny but exquisite painting created by the artist in 1960. With this title, Thompson declared his ambition to synthesize a new visual language from elements of historic European painting.

Bob Thompson: This house is mine is organized by the Colby College Art Museum in Waterville, Maine, and will travel after his Colby debut (on view now through Jan. 9, 2022) to: Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, Chicago, February 10-May 15, 2022; Top art museum, Atlanta, June 18-September 11, 2022; Hammer Museum at UCLA , Los Angeles, October 9, 2022 – January 8, 2023.

The first museum exhibition dedicated to the artist for more than twenty years, This house is mine traces Thompson’s brief but prolific transatlantic career, examining his formal inventiveness and engagement with the universal themes of community, witness, struggle and justice. In just eight years, he tackled the exclusive Western canon, developing a lexicon of enigmatic forms that he incorporated into his work. Human and animal figures, often silhouetted and relatively without features, populate mysterious vignettes set in wooded landscapes or haunt theatrically compressed spaces. Thompson reconfigures well-known compositions by European artists such as Piero della Francesca and Francisco de Goya through brilliant acts of formal distortion and elision, recasting these scenes in sumptuous color. Occasionally, familiar characters appear: jazz greats Nina Simone and Ornette Coleman, and writers LeRoi Jones (later Amiri Baraka) and Allen Ginsberg.

Bob Thompson, “Untitled”, 1962. Colby College Museum of Art / Gift of the Alex Katz Foundation / © Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York / Photo: Luc Demers

Bringing together paintings and works on paper from over fifty public and private collections across the United States, This house is mine centers Bob Thompson’s work in expansive historical narratives of art and ongoing dialogues on the politics of representation, tracing his enduring influence. The exhibition is accompanied by a richly illustrated catalog of academics, artists and poets, published in association with Yale University Press.

Robert Louis (Bob) Thompson briefly studied medicine at Boston University before enrolling in the studio program at the University of Louisville, which broke up in 1951. As an art student, Thompson explored the languages ​​of totemic abstraction then in vogue and developed an extraordinary skill. in academic drawing. He spent the summer of 1958 in Provincetown, Massachusetts, where he continued his training at the Seong Moy School of Painting and Graphic Arts and formed precious friendships. Thompson also encountered the work of the recently deceased German emigrant artist Jan Müller (1922-1958), whose figurative style steered him towards new expressive possibilities.

Bob Thompson, “Blue Madonna”, 1961. Oil on canvas. 51 1/2 × 74 3/4 in. (130.8 × 189.9 cm). The Detroit Institute of the Arts. Gift of Edward Levine in memory of Bob Thompson. © Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York. Photo: The Detroit Institute of Arts, USA / Bridgeman Images

Thompson quickly settled in New York City, where he joined fellow artists Allan Kaprow and Red Grooms in some of their first multimedia performance events called “Happenings”. A jazz enthusiast, Thompson frequented downtown clubs such as the Slugs’ Saloon and the Five Spot Café, where legendary artists like Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane and Charlie Haden performed. These musicians materialize in many of Thompson’s paintings and drawings, including Ornette (Birmingham Museum of Art, 1960-1961) and Music garden (Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, 1960). This pivotal period was marked by Thompson’s first solo exhibition in New York City, and over the following years his work entered some of the most important collections of modern art in the United States.

In 1961, Thompson and his wife, Carol, made their first trip to Europe together, spending time in London and Paris and eventually settling in Ibiza. Thompson was able to fully immerse himself in the traditions that formed the core of his practice. During his stay in Spain, he deepened his study of Francisco de Goya (1746-1828), and paintings such as Untitled (Colby College Museum of Art, 1962) demonstrates his intoxicating dialogue with Los Caprichos, the series of biting and satirical prints by the Spanish artist. On a second trip to Europe, the couple moved to Rome, where Thompson tragically died on May 30, 1966 from gallbladder surgery.

Memorial exhibitions at the New School for Social Research (1969) and the Speed ​​Art Museum (1971) celebrated his life and career. In 1998, Thelma Golden and Judith Wilson organized a fundamental science retrospective of her work at the Whitney Museum of American Art. More recently, Thompson’s paintings have featured in group exhibitions such as Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties; The Color Line: African-American artists and segregation; and The Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power. Bob Thompson’s estate is represented by the Michael Rosenfeld Gallery.

Bob Thompson, “Homage to Nina Simone”, 1965. Oil on canvas. (Minneapolis Institute of Art / John R. Van Derlip Fund / © Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York)


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Why You Should Watch ‘Loving Vincent’ – The Daily Eastern News https://grattage.info/why-you-should-watch-loving-vincent-the-daily-eastern-news/ https://grattage.info/why-you-should-watch-loving-vincent-the-daily-eastern-news/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 18:41:35 +0000 https://grattage.info/why-you-should-watch-loving-vincent-the-daily-eastern-news/ Few people have heard of the movie “Loving Vincent”. I only heard about it a month before it was released in 2017. My high school art teacher showed the trailer to my class, and I was instantly in love. I don’t really know what attracts me to Vincent van Gogh, but he is most definitely […]]]>

Few people have heard of the movie “Loving Vincent”. I only heard about it a month before it was released in 2017. My high school art teacher showed the trailer to my class, and I was instantly in love.

I don’t really know what attracts me to Vincent van Gogh, but he is most definitely one of my favorite artists. I was reading biographies about her in high school, and my wallpaper was a collection of her paintings at one point. I knew a lot about him, and let me tell you, it blew me away to see his paintings move on screen.

The entire film is animated in oil paint. The film took six years to produce and over 65,000 paintings to animate. The producers first recorded the film in live-action, with actors in front of green screens. Then, around 125 different painters were hired to paint in the style of van Gogh and create a scene in which the actors were immersed in his paintings.

The film also has an interesting backstory – it follows the main character, Armand, as he tries to deliver a letter to van Gogh’s brother, Theo van Gogh, a few weeks after Vincent’s death. In search of Théo, Armand meets many people who knew Vincent during his lifetime. He’s starting to learn so much about this man he had never heard of, and almost every aspect of him, both good and bad. The stories play out on screen: both the stories Armand hears about Vincent and Armand’s journey to deliver the letter.

Personally, I watch the film more for the visual aspect. For me, that’s enough. Usually I don’t pay too much attention to the animation style of a movie, let alone the story. And if the story of “Loving Vincent” is not bad, the visual aspect attracts me much more. It still baffles me that what I am looking at has been hand painted by so many people for so long, and it has turned out to be amazing. It is also shocking that the team was able to imitate van Gogh’s painting style so closely. As an artist myself, it was hard enough to find my own style of painting. I can’t imagine imitating anyone else, especially a famous artist who has been gone for over a hundred years.

So if you are looking for a new movie to watch, I recommend “Loving Vincent”, especially if you like art. It’s hard not to appreciate the work that has gone into it. It’s also hard not to look at the screen with the perfectly balanced colors, tones, and moods throughout the movie. It’s one of my favorite movies of all time, and it could be one of yours too, if that feels like it’s in your back alley.

Ian Stobaugh is a German major freshman. He can be contacted at 581-1812 or [email protected]


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