Painting scenery – Grattage http://grattage.info/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 22:25:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://grattage.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Painting scenery – Grattage http://grattage.info/ 32 32 Beautifying Flint, providing opportunities for local artists focuses on Free City Mural Festival 2022 https://grattage.info/beautifying-flint-providing-opportunities-for-local-artists-focuses-on-free-city-mural-festival-2022/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 20:46:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/beautifying-flint-providing-opportunities-for-local-artists-focuses-on-free-city-mural-festival-2022/ FLINT, MI – For more than a dozen artists around the world, buildings and structures in Flint will serve as blank canvases over the next week as they paint murals for this year’s Free City Mural Festival. year. The festival, which kicks off Saturday June 25 and runs for a week, ending Saturday July 2, […]]]>

FLINT, MI – For more than a dozen artists around the world, buildings and structures in Flint will serve as blank canvases over the next week as they paint murals for this year’s Free City Mural Festival. year.

The festival, which kicks off Saturday June 25 and runs for a week, ending Saturday July 2, features murals by 17 artists, according to an event brochure. The event serves to beautify parts of the city while shining the spotlight on local artists.

“The goal is to change Flint’s image and help spruce up the areas that aren’t the most beautiful and try to help solve the burn problem that we have,” said Joe Schipani, executive director of the Flint Public Art Project. “It also helps artists network. Mixing our local artists here with a group of artists from around the world helps build those networks, gets them traveling, gets them more jobs, and gets them noticed at a higher level.

Schipani said local artists previously featured in Flint were able to network through the inaugural festival and have moved on to greater things.

“Murals are a seasonal thing here in Michigan,” he said. “Because of that, some of our guys went to different festivals around the world in Mexico City, Miami. They traveled a lot more in the winter and managed to make a living doing this work.

The first mural festival was held in October 2019. The Flint Public Art Project revamped the Free City Festival into an international mural festival to help turn Flint’s narrative into an art city, according to information provided. by the organization.

Nine artists have been brought together to help change the landscape of parts of the city, and in 2019 over 100 murals were added to Flint.

But after the inaugural festival included art from 20 artists, the momentum was halted when the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent security measures implemented due to the pandemic brought the festival to a halt in 2020. and 2021.

Anyway, more than 100 murals were still painted across the city during the duration.

This year will be the first festival since the pandemic.

“It created excitement,” Schipani said. “It’s fun to see the new murals going up and it’s a great networking opportunity for local artists. It’s a good thing and it’s a fun thing for the city.

This year’s festival theme – “Imagining Flint’s Ideal Food System” – also aims to draw attention to areas in Flint – and other areas of Michigan – that can be improved.

Flint Public Art Project partnered this year with the Flint Leverage Points Project, a group completing a four-year study of the city’s food system. The theme was chosen after inadequacies in the food system were identified and highlighted during the Flint water crisis and the pandemic.

“It’s a nice artistic way to remind us that we have work to do here,” Schipani said.

Apart from the murals, many activities will also be offered throughout the week. Music will be played throughout the week in different areas of the city, and workshops and artist meetings will also be offered.

Below is a list of the artists who will be featured during the festival, as well as where they are from and where their murals will be painted:

-Depsone, Puerto Rico, 1273 Broadway Blvd.

-Klonism, Mexico, 4514 N. Saginaw St.

– Ripe Mind, CA, 1273 Broadway Blvd.

-Danielle Mastrion, New York, Riverbank Park, east of Saginaw Street

-Kevin (Scraps) Burdick, Flint, 1273 Broadway Blvd.

-Wake-N-Paint, Flint, 1522 Harrison St.

-Pauly Everett, Flint, 444 Saginaw Street.

-J Muzacz, Texas, 4514 N. Saginaw St.

-Johnny Fletcher, Flint, 610 Martin Luther King Ave.

-Zach Curtis, Pontiac, 705 Garland St.

-Colormebara, Guatemala, 2000 Saginaw St.

-Zulu, Florida, 1522 Harrison St.

-Mike Cobley, Flint, 1632 Beach St.

-Krystal Cook, Flint, 3107 Saginaw St.

-Isiah Lattimore, Flint, 6201 N. Saginaw St.

-Registered Artist, Florida, 3107 N. Saginaw St.

-James Smith, North Carolina, 3101 N. Saginaw St.

Go here for more information on when and where the events will take place, as well as biographies of each of the participating artists.

Read more on The Flint Journal:

Grand Blanc’s first food truck festival of 2022 will feature 14 local restaurants

Nonprofit created by former Michigan football player donates jerseys to new SBEV team in Flint

The Clio Firefighters Homecoming Carnival and Parade starts today


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Smurfit Kappa, DowDuPont, International Paper, Mondi plc – Designer Women https://grattage.info/smurfit-kappa-dowdupont-international-paper-mondi-plc-designer-women/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 06:07:13 +0000 https://grattage.info/smurfit-kappa-dowdupont-international-paper-mondi-plc-designer-women/ The relationship with the Global paint packaging market from 2022 to 2028 Proposed by MarketsandResearch.biz recently aired. The data supports an improvement guide for the Paint Packaging market and helps clients list their main intentions to achieve their business goals. These are various quantitative and conceptual tools that are used to improve market organization. These […]]]>

The relationship with the Global paint packaging market from 2022 to 2028 Proposed by MarketsandResearch.biz recently aired. The data supports an improvement guide for the Paint Packaging market and helps clients list their main intentions to achieve their business goals. These are various quantitative and conceptual tools that are used to improve market organization.

These devices combine a company’s SWOT rating, PESTEL rating for various locations identified with the market, the five PORTER powers to select multiple attributes such as buyer’s and supplier’s strength in the market, replacement risk and the organization the challenges and dangers of the new hopes that are watching.

The report is based solely on information collected through primary and secondary research. For desktop research, raw data is filtered and verified at every stage so that only authenticated data is collected and used for market derivation.

DOWNLOAD A FREE SAMPLE REPORT: https://www.marketsandresearch.biz/sample-request/282691

The survey is also completed according to the applications:

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The types of markets examined in this report are:

  • Metal
  • Polyethylene terephthalate (PET)
  • Polyethylene (PE)
  • Polypropylene (PP)
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  • DowDuPont
  • International paper
  • Mondi plc
  • Amcor Limited
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  • Mauser group

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Rare Joseon Dynasty Painting Returns to Korea from the United States After 490 Years https://grattage.info/rare-joseon-dynasty-painting-returns-to-korea-from-the-united-states-after-490-years/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 07:37:10 +0000 https://grattage.info/rare-joseon-dynasty-painting-returns-to-korea-from-the-united-states-after-490-years/ An old painting depicting officials from the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) attending a school program at a pavilion called Dokseodang Study has returned to Korea after 490 years. It was purchased by the Cultural Heritage Administration at an auction held in the United States in March. [CULTURAL HERITAGE ADMINISTRATION] An old painting depicting officials from the […]]]>

An old painting depicting officials from the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) attending a school program at a pavilion called Dokseodang Study has returned to Korea after 490 years. It was purchased by the Cultural Heritage Administration at an auction held in the United States in March. [CULTURAL HERITAGE ADMINISTRATION]

An old painting depicting officials from the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) participating in a school program in a pavilion by the Han River near present-day Oksu-dong in Seongdong District, east of Seoul, is returned to his country of origin after 490 years.

Such paintings which depict the gathering of officials at this pavilion, or a study called dokseodangis called dokseodang gyehoedo.

The Cultural Heritage Administration (CHA) announced that it was able to bring the painting back with the Korean Overseas Cultural Heritage Foundation at an auction in the United States held in march. The CHA revealed the 16th-century painting to local media on Wednesday at the National Palace Museum of Korea in central Seoul and said a special exhibition on Korean cultural heritages returning from overseas, which will include the painting, will be held at the museum. from July 7 to September 25.

According to CHA, the painting was created to commemorate a gathering of officials who participated in the sagadokseo program during the reign of King Jungjong (r. 1506-1544).

Sagadokseo was a program to train talented young civil servants in the Joseon Dynasty. It provided for a sabbatical allowing civil servants to devote themselves full-time to study rather than to the management of government affairs.

“It is a work of great value and is the oldest among the three surviving examples of 16th-century dokseodang gyehoedo paintings,” said CHA official Lee Seon-hyeok. “In particular, its year of production can be determined by examining the names and titles of the participants. It is a masterpiece that demonstrates the main characteristics of landscape paintings from the early Joseon Dynasty.

The title of the painting, written in Chinese characters across the top of the painting, reads: “dokseodang gyehoedo”. The central part of the painting represents the old district of Dumopo, which is now Oksu-dong. Mount Eungbong is in the center, which still exists today and is visited by many nearby locals.

Dokseodang Study was built in 1517 during the reign of King Jungjong. It housed an institution to promote study and research and was used for the sagadokseo program until it was destroyed during the Imjin War (1592-1598).

The inscriptions on the lower part of the table specify the names of the 12 participants of the program. [CULTURAL HERITAGE ADMINISTRATION]

The inscriptions on the lower part of the table specify the names of the 12 participants of the program. [CULTURAL HERITAGE ADMINISTRATION]

The inscriptions on the lower part of the board list the names and coordinates of the 12 participants in the rally.

“The participants were young officials in their twenties and thirties who had participated in the sagadokseo program between 1516 and 1530,” Lee said.

Among the twelve are notable figures such as Ju Se-bung (1495-1554), an official known for his integrity who laid the foundations of Korea’s neo-Confucian academies, called seowon, establishing the Confucian Academy of Baegundong; Song In-su (1499-1547), the author of “Gyuamjip” (Complete Works of Song In-su), revered as a master of neo-Confucianism; and Song Sun (1493-1582), who excelled in poetry and prose and held key government posts for five decades.

“The official titles of the participants recorded on the painting have an additional importance in that they serve as the basis for estimating the period in which the painting was produced,” Lee said.

According to the Annals of King Jungjong, called Jungjong sillok, Song and Heo Hang (1497-1537) were appointed to new government positions in 1531 and 1532, respectively.

“The government positions they held are recorded on the chart, which means we can assume the chart was created in or around 1531,” Lee said. “The painting is very rare in that it is a work of which we can know the period of production, that is to say the beginning of the Joseon dynasty, a period of which few works remain from art, and what is more, as a representative masterpiece of the real landscape paintings of the time.

It is unclear how the painting was taken out of the country, according to the CHA. The painting’s previous owner is said to have been Kiichiro Kanda, the former director of the Kyoto National Museum in Japan. It was sold after his death and ended up in an auction in the United States.

BY YIM SEUNG-HYE [yim.seunghye@joongang.co.kr]


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Ukrainian artist pokes fun at Russian invaders in Odessa style https://grattage.info/ukrainian-artist-pokes-fun-at-russian-invaders-in-odessa-style/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 14:35:56 +0000 https://grattage.info/ukrainian-artist-pokes-fun-at-russian-invaders-in-odessa-style/ ODESA, Ukraine — Before the Russian invasion, Odessa-born artist Ihor Husev achieved considerable success at home and abroad with his hauntingly dreamlike paintings: A ballet dancer stands on train tracks on snow; a speedboat sits on a trailer by a lake, under an ominous sky that suggests summer is just a memory. “It takes a […]]]>

ODESA, Ukraine — Before the Russian invasion, Odessa-born artist Ihor Husev achieved considerable success at home and abroad with his hauntingly dreamlike paintings: A ballet dancer stands on train tracks on snow; a speedboat sits on a trailer by a lake, under an ominous sky that suggests summer is just a memory.

“It takes a month to do each one,” he said, gesturing to a stack of oil paintings on canvas he made before Feb. 24. .”

That moment began when Ukrainians in Odessa and elsewhere woke up that morning to a “nightmare”, he said, as Russian rockets fell in and near towns across the country.

Like millions of people in Ukraine and elsewhere, it was a nightmare he never expected to come true despite tens of thousands of troops massed at the borders, threats from Russian President Vladimir Putin and US authorities warning that a full-scale invasion could happen any day.

“Putin announced everything so ostentatiously and endlessly that I thought it was just another one of his scary fairy tales,” Husev recalled.

The invasion led to a new turn in Husev’s art, and a fairy tale figured in a drawing he published on facebook the first day of the invasion – the first work of what he calls “series 3 world war 2022”.

Husev drew Lenin’s grave walking on chicken legs dripping with blood and wrote “the Russians are coming” below the image, the meaning of which would be lost on almost anyone in Ukraine or Russia: The mummified past is approaching and it is as creepy as Baba Yaga, an evil witch and the ultimate villain of Slavic folklore.

Lenin’s tomb, uprooted from Moscow’s Red Square and leaving bloody traces when walking on chicken legs like Baba Yaga’s hut. Drawing published on February 24.

Husev was also scared. “But what could I do?” He asked. “My wife and I realized we’d rather die in our beds than run away, and I decided to keep people’s spirits up by doing what I do best: drawing.”

And he does it with a healthy dose of Odessa’s most famous commodity: humor.

“If you can laugh at something, you stop being scared, and when you stop being scared, you’re already a winner,” Husev, 46, said.

As the death and destruction inflicted on Ukraine continues with no end in sight and mistrust is widespread in Odessa, which was bombed but eluded capture, this is humor with a dark streak.

There is Lenin’s tomb, uprooted from Moscow’s Red Square and leaving bloody traces when walking on chicken legs like Baba Yaga’s hut.

There is a drawing of farm fields and a road that is eerily reminiscent of optimistic and deceptive Soviet-era art and is captioned with a pun, saying both “Everything will be fine” and “Everything will be fertilizer”.

A drawing published on March 16 whose pun says, "Everything will be fine/Fertilizer."

A drawing published on March 16 whose pun says: “Everything will be fine / fertilizer”.

And there is a design that echoes a famous 19th century painting by Russian artist Vasily Surikov, only here a sleigh pulled through the snow does not carry a noblewoman dressed in black under arrest but a washing machine bright white – a reference to looting by Russian soldiers who returned these goods from Ukraine.

A sled pulled through the snow carries a bright white washing machine.  Drawing published on April 8.

A sled pulled through the snow carries a bright white washing machine. Drawing published on April 8.

In May, he published a simple article that shows the Ukrainian and Russian spellings of the name of his city – Odessa and Odessa – with a fiery bang in place of each letter “s”.

Husev has drawn attention with his new works, finding himself invited to appear on TV news in his country, where the invasion has increased solidarity that had already been on the rise since 2014 when Russia seized the peninsula. of Crimea – southeast of Odessa – and fomented war in the eastern region known as Donbass.

What strikes almost anyone who comes to the predominantly Russian-speaking port city in the fourth month since the invasion is the proliferation of blue and yellow national flags that are painted on the walls of many of the buildings.

“The janitors who painted them are the real artists of today,” Husev said, speaking as he strolled through his sunny studio filled with books, plants and sculptures. “Unlike some of my artist friends, who continue to paint flowers and landscapes.”

Husev’s war drawings, meanwhile, are all done on the pages and covers of old books he bought at Starokonka, a flea market in Odessa. Remakes of images from the Soviet school book Mother Tongue are among his favorites.

He believes the works he posts on social media are popular precisely because this aesthetic of torn books, deconstructed classics, and ridiculed Soviet heroes resonates with audiences today.

The inscription says, "Like it or not, the Javelins get the job done." Drawing published on March 4.

The inscription reads: “Like it or not, the Javelins get the job done.” Drawing published on March 4.

Some of his works have been printed and exhibited at Odessa’s Central Book Market, which has become a popular meeting place – a venue for jazz concerts and plays – as the city seeks to come back to life after the shock initial caused by the war, despite the incessant attacks.

“We all live in an altered state of consciousness. There was a psychedelic revolution in art back then, and today there is the bombardirovka,” he said – Russian for bombardment.

For people enjoying their morning coffee at the book market, Odessa seems calm. Military experts say that as long as Ukraine’s defensive line is maintained in Mykolaiv, more than 100 kilometers to the northeast, the city is safe.

With thousands of internally displaced people moving in and out, a daily curfew and beaches mined against the threat of an amphibious attack, anti-Russian sentiment appears to be growing in Odessa.

In mid-April, five Russian sister city plaques were removed from a central plaza, and the mayor pledged to replace them with names of cities that have offered help during the current war.

Husev, who describes himself as a Russian-speaking Ukrainian patriot, argues that the legendary city’s past and identity need to be rethought with caution.

“I wouldn’t just dismantle the statue of Catherine the Great, who founded Odessa,” he said, referring to a controversial downtown monument. “It’s great architecture, unlike the stupid copies of Lenin that we rightly got rid of.”

“I prefer to put a blue and yellow scarf on his neck,” he added.

Husev said he believes that while Russia sows reckless destruction on Ukraine, Odessa will be able to break away from its Russian heritage in a self-reflective way, because at its heart it has always been a cosmopolitan city and European.

“What Ukrainians and Russians are witnessing right now is a war between the KVN and the KGB,” he said; the former is a television comedy contest popular since the Soviet era. “It’s a conflict between laughter and anger, confidence and brute force.”

KVN, where comic-turned-president Volodymyr Zelenskiy first caught the eye, is proving more effective, he said: “After all, the enemy who was supposed to crush us turned out to be stupid , lazy, greedy and corrupt.”

And that’s why he remains optimistic.

“We will win this war anyway. The only question is at what cost,” he said.


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The fierce spirit of painter AD Maddox https://grattage.info/the-fierce-spirit-of-painter-ad-maddox/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 19:58:40 +0000 https://grattage.info/the-fierce-spirit-of-painter-ad-maddox/ She goes by AD, short for Amelia Drane Maddox, born in Nashville, Tennessee. But in spirit, AD Maddox has an outgoing presence matched with an introvert’s intense focus on creating art that impacts our senses. As she says, doing fine art is not a team sport and now, after half a century of age and […]]]>

She goes by AD, short for Amelia Drane Maddox, born in Nashville, Tennessee. But in spirit, AD Maddox has an outgoing presence matched with an introvert’s intense focus on creating art that impacts our senses. As she says, doing fine art is not a team sport and now, after half a century of age and at the peak of her creative powers, painting for long hours is her favorite muse.

How to paint water from the point of view of being on the inside with fish? Think about it for a moment.

Maddox is best known for making stunning artwork depictions of trout and horses. Some of them are big, bold and full of color, possessing almost a Pop Art quality (which has made his originals in huge demand among young collectors). Other visions, especially his recent pieces – several of which are due to be unveiled on Friday June 24 at his annual party in Livingston – appear to be about fish. But it is a question of transmitting the illusion of effects that have captivated painters since the Renaissance.

Maddox is quick to acknowledge that this latest series pushes the boundaries of hyper-photo-realism to the limit, to the point that while some may react in disbelief to the use of photographs as reference material, if one dispute their to try to do what Maddox does with his alchemy, they quickly go silent.

One of Maddox’s dazzling images graces the cover of the new book, Training effectswritten by mountain diary founder Todd Wilkinson. “It’s one of the most eye-catching covers for a book I’ve ever done and it’s down to AD Maddox’s magnetic paint,” says editor Nancy Cleary.

A few years ago, Maddox made Livingston her home base after beginning her career as a painter in Jackson Hole, where she was mentored by the late Greg McHuron, spending time in her hometown of Nashville and influenced by a number of contemporary artists in Atlanta. She has been coming to Paradise Valley and Jackson Hole for years and her family has a home in Tom Miner Basin.

Maddox loves fly-fishing and shooting clay pigeons, which she does in style, though these days she’s also adept at navigating the whirlwind of rising fame by relaxing in the back of a classic Ducatti 999. In Montana, she savors the liberating sensation of her platinum blonde locks blowing out the back of her helmet, the sweet vibes and scents of nature flooding her as she hits the warp drive. Maddox’s effusive enthusiasm for the outdoors is both genuine and infectious; so, too, his art.

Impressionist landscape painter Scott Christensen, who received the West Purchase Award several years ago, has this to say about Maddox. “She’s grown a lot taking her designs to a whole new level,” he said. “She pays attention to her cutting edge work instead of being too graphic. You can see the maturation that is happening. AD Maddox is on a roll.

While it’s misleading to label Maddox an iconoclast, she is fiercely strong-willed and independent, defying those who say art should be pursued under a rigid set of rules. And it was this attitude that freed her. She has collectors all over the world.

The screening of his new works, certainly festive, lasts from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday June 24 at AD Maddox Studios, 114 North B Street, in Livingston. The public is invited. mountain diary recently engaged Maddox in a back-and-forth.

Mountain diary: What is this show about?

AD MADDOX: My annual summer opening night showcasing new 2022 original oil paintings from a series I call “Isolated Water” and all my other available originals.

MOJO: How did you start “painting fish?”

MADDOX: I started painting Trout in 1998 while living in Jackson Hole. My team thought it would be a popular topic for my western audience. These pieces still sold out and I have continued to paint trout ever since.

MOJO: Your palette and approach to color can be quite pungent, in a way that commands attention. What do you want viewers to pay attention to?

MADDOX: I leave that to everyone because there is not a single answer. Each person is affected by a work of art in their own way. I paint photorealism, and if you can imagine painting all the colors and values ​​in moving water, then you know the magnitude of my challenge.

MOJO: You have been a proud Greater Yellowstone resident, living in both Jackson Hole and Livingstone/Paradise Valley. What sets this region apart?

MADDOX: The vastness of space bordered by mountains. I find the beautiful landscape inspiring because there is plenty of space to be free and play.

MOJO: What is the best compliment you have ever received about your art?

MADDOX: The most memorable are how the piece reminds them of a great memory they have with a loved one.


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The Recorder – Times Past: Local Artists of the 20th Century and Beyond https://grattage.info/the-recorder-times-past-local-artists-of-the-20th-century-and-beyond/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 15:39:03 +0000 https://grattage.info/the-recorder-times-past-local-artists-of-the-20th-century-and-beyond/ Published: 06/19/2022 11:23:41 Modified: 06/19/2022 11:23:20 In 1943, when I worked at the CH Demond store during my high school years, there was a very large room/gallery where artists could bring their works to display and sell. The store carried and sold all manner of artist supplies and the store also did framing. W. Lester […]]]>

Published: 06/19/2022 11:23:41

Modified: 06/19/2022 11:23:20

In 1943, when I worked at the CH Demond store during my high school years, there was a very large room/gallery where artists could bring their works to display and sell. The store carried and sold all manner of artist supplies and the store also did framing.

W. Lester Stevens of Conway was just one of the artists who used the store. Some of his paintings were of the Rockport area and local streams and landscapes.

Well-known Stephen Maniatty was a masterful painter who primarily used oils in his work. His subjects were mainly landscapes and later in life he painted mainly flowers and still lifes. At Douglas Auctioneers, his paintings fetch high prices because he was so talented and well known.

Stephen Hamilton mainly used watercolors on his paintings. Many of his works are winter scenes and different shades of blue and white. He did a great job on all of his paintings and I think his home base was Amherst.

Howard Sauter, who owned a grocery store on Pond Street in Greenfield, painted some very large pictures. My first wife, Jeanette Houston, took classes with him at the YMCA where he had an art class. Jeanette has become a very good artist.

Robert Strong Woodward of Buckland was well known for all of his paintings. Most of his paintings depict farm silos and barns from this region. He was in a wheelchair but had a driver to drive his open touring limo to where he wanted to paint. A calendar is made and sold each year of his work.

Polly French of Shelburne Falls paints small images of her work. She is very good at it.

Joe Baker of Greenfield trimmed the windows of Wilson’s department store. His paintings were smaller in size but were perfectly done.

These people were just a few of the local artists who lived in Franklin County years ago and still do; all were endowed with talent.

This story may be my last for this column. Thank you for taking the time to read them.

Occasional columnist Robert Bitzer, 91, lives in Erving.


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O’Keeffe strove to be close to the NM landscapes that inspired her https://grattage.info/okeeffe-strove-to-be-close-to-the-nm-landscapes-that-inspired-her/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 21:02:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/okeeffe-strove-to-be-close-to-the-nm-landscapes-that-inspired-her/ Denim shirt, Levi Strauss and Co.; denim shirt, maker unknown; shirt, Walter McCrory, Inc. “O’Keeffe in the Landscape Exhibit.” Abiquiú Visitor Centre, 2022. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. (Courtesy of Georgia O’Keeffe Museum) In 1940s America, for a woman to go camping in the desert was virtually unheard of. Enter Georgia O’Keeffe. Determined to get as […]]]>
Denim shirt, Levi Strauss and Co.; denim shirt, maker unknown; shirt, Walter McCrory, Inc. “O’Keeffe in the Landscape Exhibit.” Abiquiú Visitor Centre, 2022. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. (Courtesy of Georgia O’Keeffe Museum)

In 1940s America, for a woman to go camping in the desert was virtually unheard of.

Enter Georgia O’Keeffe.

Determined to get as close to the New Mexico landscape as possible, O’Keeffe went camping at Glen Canyon, Plaza Blanca and what she called The Black Place located 150 miles northwest of her Abiquiú home. .

The Georgia O’Keeffe Visitor Center in Abiquiú is hosting its first exhibit, “O’Keeffe in the Landscape,” through April 2, 2023.

The exhibition presents Marie Chabot’s photographs of the artist in the middle of a campsite, her clothes, her hiking boots and her equipment.

O’Keeffe had learned to drive in Taos and purchased a 1928 Ford Model T so he could go car camping in remote locations. At the time, she didn’t need a driver’s license.

“She would set up her tent outside,” said historic properties curator Giustina Renzoni. “She had the passenger seat removed to put a table with all her paints and brushes. She basically wore a moving studio.

The artist has traveled to evoke the essence of these spectacular views in his work.

Aware of her safety, O’Keeffe never traveled alone, often taking her friend Maria Chabot, who photographed her on various trips. Chabot had worked for salon maven Mabel Dodge Luhan in Taos. She was the general contractor for the Abiquiú house of O’Keeffe. O’Keeffe also camped with famous photographers like Ansel Adams, Eliot Porter and Todd Webb.

“It was a very creative atmosphere,” Renzoni said.

The artist discovered these unusual sites while discussing with the local populations. She had heard of Ghost Ranch, where she first bought a house in 1940, from acquaintances when she was staying with Luhan.

“She knew she had to see it herself,” Renzoni said.

She also hired local guides.

“What she was doing was very unusual at the time, especially for a woman,” she added.

By the early 1900s, camping had become a leisure activity as a reaction against urbanization, Renzoni said.

O’Keeffe first went camping in Yosemite National Park with Adams in 1938. Telling herself it was a vacation, she took no canvases, paints, or brushes. She regretted this decision.

“Of course, as soon as she got there, she ended up borrowing supplies from people and using charcoal from the fire,” Renzoni said.

In New Mexico, she picked up rocks and bones as she moved through the ragged country.

“It’s an object of nature,” Renzoni said of the rocks. “She liked to hold them and feel the whole rock.”

The bones became part of his image repertoire.

“To her, it was representative of desert life and natural imagery and color,” Renzoni added.

O’Keeffe went rafting for the first time at age 74, invited by Webb.

They headed for Utah’s Glen Canyon. O’Keeffe wrote to his sister about the trip. After a full day of rafting, the group camped near the river and settled in, only to be awakened by a torrential downpour.

“She loved it; even the rain,” Renzoni said. “She thought it was a wonderful experience.”

The exhibit also includes a camping dress, with large pockets for collecting stones.

Established in 2018, the Georgia O’Keeffe Visitor Center is located one mile from the artist’s home in Abiquiú. Visitors can take a shuttle to see his home and studio.


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Artist Dali Yamandú Canosa Creates Contemporary Surrealism • St Pete Catalyst https://grattage.info/artist-dali-yamandu-canosa-creates-contemporary-surrealism-st-pete-catalyst/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:29:02 +0000 https://grattage.info/artist-dali-yamandu-canosa-creates-contemporary-surrealism-st-pete-catalyst/ It is not often that well-known international artists visit St. Petersburg themselves, accompanying exhibitions of their work. Visit, a collection of paintings, drawings and photographs by Uruguayan-Spanish artist Yamandú Canosa, will open Saturday at the Dali Museum. It is an extraordinary installation that takes up every inch of the Hough Gallery on the third level. […]]]>

It is not often that well-known international artists visit St. Petersburg themselves, accompanying exhibitions of their work. Visit, a collection of paintings, drawings and photographs by Uruguayan-Spanish artist Yamandú Canosa, will open Saturday at the Dali Museum.

It is an extraordinary installation that takes up every inch of the Hough Gallery on the third level. Canosa has been in town for three weeks building the installation with Dali’s curator William Jeffett.

Thursday morning, the artist was there in the gallery and agreed to cross Visit with a journalist.

The title Visit refers to Port Lligat, Spain, where Salvador Dali lived and worked all his life. Canosa, whose works frequently explore the subconscious through metaphor, perspective, color and texture, went to Port Lligat as an exercise in interpretation.

“It’s very simple,” he says. “It’s a dialogue between contemporary art and surrealism. Investigate the legacy of surrealism in contemporary art. I am a contemporary artist, and I visited to find out which part of my work belonged to the legacy of surrealism.

“Because surrealism was not an aesthetic movement, but a language movement. You can find artists – Joan Miro, Dali, Marcel Duchamp – these three artists had absolutely different aesthetics, but all three belonged to the same idea and the same hope that surrealism gives us.

In other words, he wanted to see what Dali saw.

Jeffett offered: “The work of Yamadú Canosa is a contemporary exploration of the continuing significance of Surrealism…the work is significant in today’s world as it explores the intersection of global culture ranging from Europe to Latin America.”

Residence of Dali: “Casa (House)”, 2021, Oil on canvas, 130 x 190 cm © Yamandú Canosa/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2022.

Visit is vast – in the largest exhibition room, one wall is dominated by an image of Dali’s house and studio. On the opposite wall – in the distance – is a rendition of the stone island resting at the end of the bay, depicted in many of Dali’s paintings of the location. “En la Cueva (In the Cave)” is presented as a positive/negative in bright red, depicting the entrance to a cave from both the inside and the outside. It is, says Canosa, like the suggestive mirror images used in the Rorschach psychological test.

And the expanse of black soil between represents water.

“I need space, because I’m a landscape designer,” he explains. “And I always do an installation around the space.” The whole landscape is linked, he specifies, with a horizon line that runs the width of the room, on each wall. It is at the average human eye level. “It’s the key to the gaze,” he says. “When you see the horizon line, you enter the landscape.”

The images, he added, “are in their place” on either side of the “horizon”. Around the massive gallery space there are objects in the sky – a star, a constellation, the wind, a cloud, the sun (filled with the abstract nets of the village fishermen).

Some images are buried “underground”, signifying death, or perhaps a dream state. Dreams, of course, have always played a major role in surrealism.

“It’s not exactly a script,” Canosa said. “It’s more like a story. Like poetry. But more important is the relationship that each image has with the other. And we begin to cultivate not a story, but an atmosphere. Here is an atmosphere.

Some sequences along the timeline are dark, some are not. He highlighted what he called the happiest atmosphere of the timeline trip: One painting is the silhouette of a woman playing the violin. She has the head of a cricket. A very small woman removes the pebbles from a piano keyboard, “to bring back the music”, according to the artist. A character sings into a microphone while a giant bird extracts an insect from a tree.

Everything, explains the artist, is linked. “The idea is that they all belong to the same atmosphere. And they explain this atmosphere in different aspects; then you begin to have a scent and an aroma for the mood.

Canosa said the north wind, called Tramontane, is like a character in this part of Spain. “Everyone says this wind drives you crazy. It is said to be the wind of surrealism.

He tested his own subconscious with Blind Drawings, presented as a series of sketches of a small spindly tree (this is also part of the exhibition). He drew them all without ever looking at the white papers.

The designs are fascinating, in that they are similar and they all look like the item, but no two are exactly alike. “I tried to do my best,” smiled Canosa.

Dali Museum website.

With “Piedra (Stone)”, 2021, Gouache and oil on cardboard, 81.5 x 120.5 cm, © Yamandú Canosa / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2022. Photo by Bill DeYoung.


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Rogue Valley Art Galleries: June 17 – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://grattage.info/rogue-valley-art-galleries-june-17-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:15:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/rogue-valley-art-galleries-june-17-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ See works by star artist Jarrett Rex Davidson at the Central Art Gallery on Medford’s Third Friday Art Walk. See the list below. Courtesy Image In Focus: Third Friday Art Walk Downtown Medford’s galleries, restaurants, shops, and studios unveil new exhibits, hold art demonstrations, and more from 5-8 p.m. on the third Friday of every […]]]>

See works by star artist Jarrett Rex Davidson at the Central Art Gallery on Medford’s Third Friday Art Walk. See the list below. Courtesy Image

In Focus: Third Friday Art Walk

Downtown Medford’s galleries, restaurants, shops, and studios unveil new exhibits, hold art demonstrations, and more from 5-8 p.m. on the third Friday of every month. The Art Walk celebrates all that downtown has to offer – shopping, dining, art and culture – and new experiences are offered every month. For more information, find Medford’s Third Friday on Facebook.

American Trails: The gallery, located at the Columbia Hotel, 250 E. Main St., Ashland, showcases the arts and crafts of the indigenous peoples of North and South America. The gallery will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to Sunday. See americantrails.com or call 541-482-2553.

Art & Soul Ashland: The gallery features paintings in a variety of mediums and styles by local and regional artists. The featured exhibition, “Creative Essence – Intuitive Abstract Expressions in Watercolor,” on view through June 30, features watercolors by Lynda Hoffman-Snodgrass. Art & Soul Ashland, located at 247 E. Main St., Ashland, is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. See artandsoulashland.com or call 541-331-2986.

Art du Jour Gallery: Discover exhibitions by 17 local artists in a myriad of mediums such as watercolour, oil, acrylic, pastel, pen and ink, Conté crayon, collage, sculpture , photography, mixed media and more. The annual Charity Hubbard Student Exhibit, featuring many of Hubbard’s student works, will be on display in the main gallery and featured artists’ areas throughout June and July. Also check out paintings by star artist Angalee O’Conner on display throughout June. The gallery, located at 213 E. Main St., Medford, will be open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Openings are possible outside opening hours by reservation. See artdujourgallerymedford.com, call 541-770-3190 or email artdujourgallery213@gmail.com. Limit of 10 people in the gallery at a time.

Art Presence Art Center: The gallery, which features works in a variety of mediums by local artists is located at 206 N. Fifth St., Jacksonville, will be open from noon to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sundays. See the featured exhibit, the Southern Oregon Artists’ Studio, which features artists who capture the beauty of our local landscapes and historic buildings throughout the month of June. The main gallery will exhibit works by member artists in a variety of mediums, including watercolor, photography, oil and sculpture, and the presentation in the Galleria will be “Jacksonville is for the Birds”, featuring all kinds of birdhouses and pictures of birds on display. until June. See art-presence.org or call 541-941-7057 for more information or to schedule an appointment.

Ashland Art Works: The gallery features works by local artists in a variety of mediums, including ceramics, carpentry, fiber arts, jewelry, and garden art. See an exhibition of watercolors by Shari Southard throughout June. The Art Collective, at 291 Oak St., Ashland, will be open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesdays and Sundays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays. For details, see ashlandartworks.org or call 541-488-4735.

Central Art Gallery: The gallery will feature works by featured artist Jarrett Rex Davidson from 5-8 p.m. on Friday, June 17, during Medford’s Third Friday Art Walk. The art supply store and gallery is located at 101 N. Central Ave., Medford. For details, see centralartsupply.com or call 541-773-1444.

Fiber Arts Collective: See the work of approximately 30 fiber artisans at 37 N. Third St., Ashland. Exhibits range from sewing, dyeing, knitting, crocheting, embroidery and felting to binding, gluing, painting, printing, stenciling, beading and creating assembly pieces. Throughout June, see the work of Gayle Erbe-Hamlin, which focuses on her experience as a resident at PLAYA in Summer Lake, Oregon. Working with fiber and clay, she reflects on the landscape of the region as well as the deep presence of the First Peoples who occupied the region. The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday. Call 541-708-6966 or see fiberartscollective.com for details.

Karon Gallery: The gallery, located at 300 E. Main St., Ashland, features vintage textiles and jewelry, antiques, art, and furniture. Check out the June exhibition featuring a new collection of various masks and artifacts from Africa, as well as photos, paintings, and jewelry. Paintings by Judy Benson LaNier will be featured alongside works by Vernon Lawhorne and Joseph Bartlow. The gallery will be open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday to Saturday. See Discovergalleriekaron.com or call 541-482-9008.

Grants Pass Museum of Art: The museum, located upstairs at 229 SW G St., Grants Pass, features works by local and regional artists. See “Aloft: A Global Exhibition by Studio Quilt Art Associates,” which offers new perspectives through which to view our world, through July 22. This eclectic exhibition brings together works by more than 30 different artists from around the world. The museum will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday to Saturday and by appointment. Admission to the museum is free. The commercial gallery, Gallery One, located at street level from the museum, showcases the work of approximately 60 local artists. Kristen O’Neill is Gallery One’s Featured Artist of the Month for June. O’Neill will exhibit works from his new “Common Ground” series which features the landscape of southern Oregon and northern California, including wildfire areas. See gpmuseum.com to view a virtual tour or call 541-479-3290 for more information.

Hanson Howard Gallery: The gallery, located at 89 Oak St., Ashland, features works in a range of mediums including painting, sculpture, ceramics and fine art prints. The “Meet Me Out Left Field” exhibit, featuring Dews ceramics and paintings, will be on display through July 23. The gallery will be open from noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday and by appointment. See hansonhowardgallery.com or call 541-488-2562.

Lane Hall: Award-winning artist Lane Hall will be showing new work through June 19 at South Stage Cellars, 125 S. Third St., Jacksonville. Most of the pieces depict local scenes in mixed media or watercolor. See lanehallart.com or call an email at lanehallart@gmail.com.

Rogue Gallery & Art Center: The gallery, featuring works by local artists, at 40 S. Bartlett St., Medford, will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The main gallery will feature textile works, using vintage tobacco and cigarette bristles, by Greta Mikkelsen until June 17. Tobacco or cigarette bristles are printed textile pieces that tobacco companies inserted into their products in the early 1900s. of more than 30 artists until July 8. The Berryman Gallery, a satellite exhibition space of the RGAC, located in the second-floor lobby of the Craterian Theater, 23 S. Central Ave., Medford, will exhibit the painting works of Greg Thweatt, on view through June 28. For more information, see roguegallery.org or call 541-772-8118.

Schneider Museum of Art: Southern Oregon University’s Schneider Museum of Art will open its summer exhibition, “Indie Folk: New Art and Sounds from the Pacific Northwest,” through August 13. The Pacific Northwest is home to a unique arts ecosystem involving craft traditions, pre-industrial cultures, and Indigenous and settler histories. Like folk art, the exhibit showcases unassuming handmade works and often blurs the line between functionality and aesthetics. Artisanal woven baskets and worked wooden objects mingle with makeshift, improvised works often made from recycled materials. The exhibition features an intergenerational array of 17 notable artists from across the region, including Marita Dingus, Warren Dykeman, Joe Feddersen, Blair Saxon-Hill, Sky Hopinka, Jeffry Mitchell and Cappy Thompson. A playlist of Indie Folk music curated by Mississippi Records of Portland, a record label and boutique, will accompany the exhibit, filling the galleries with Pacific Northwest sound. Masterpieces on loan will also be displayed in the entrance gallery. The gallery, located at 555 Indiana St. Ashland, will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The Museum will be closed on Saturday June 18 for a private event. Admission is free, donations accepted. See sma.sou.edu or call 541-552-6245 for details.


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Outdoor classes a hit in Amsterdam and beyond – The Daily Gazette https://grattage.info/outdoor-classes-a-hit-in-amsterdam-and-beyond-the-daily-gazette/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 22:27:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/outdoor-classes-a-hit-in-amsterdam-and-beyond-the-daily-gazette/ Amsterdam artist Gail Talmadge felt the free open-air classes on the canal would go down well. But not as well. “I thought it would be popular. I had no idea how popular it would be,” Talmadge said. She recently began leading “Paint Along the Canal” sessions as part of the New York Power Authority and […]]]>

Amsterdam artist Gail Talmadge felt the free open-air classes on the canal would go down well. But not as well.

“I thought it would be popular. I had no idea how popular it would be,” Talmadge said.

She recently began leading “Paint Along the Canal” sessions as part of the New York Power Authority and State Canal Corporation’s “On the Canals” programs, which offer an array of free activities throughout the city. State.

Painting sessions, which are offered throughout the summer, were filling up quickly when The Gazette spoke with the artist last week.

“They are almost all full. . . [for] all summer,” Talmadge said.

At a young age, Talmadge often doodled and art remained one of his interests. She studied Sustainable Design at SUNY Empire State College and recently earned a Masters in Art Education from the University of Florida. For the past eight years, she has owned and operated Taste and Paint, a small business that offers painting lessons throughout New York State.

Previously, she was an antiques dealer and painted furniture and accessories. She also painted murals and portraits of pets.

Talmadge jokes that she will paint just about anything, although plein air style painting is a recent addition to her repertoire.

“I’m actually new to this,” Talmadge said.

Painting outdoors, rather than leading paint-and-sip style lessons, comes with the added challenge of an ever-changing environment.

“It could change from minute to minute, depending on where the sun is shining or what you’re looking at,” Talmadge said. “My first class, I had 20 people come in, and if you stand at the first place where the easel is, and then you go to where the 20th person stands, what you see at each easel is [a] completely different scene. This leads to a variety of landscape portraits by the time the session is over.

Weekly “Sunset Painting” sessions are scheduled on Thursdays at the Mohawk Valley Gateway Overlook Bridge and are among the most popular classes. Weekend sessions are also planned at Yankee Hill, Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site.

“A lot of people don’t even know this place exists. I go there every day to walk my dog,” Talmadge said. “There are locks, there is the river [and] there’s actually an old general store from the 1800s. It’s a hidden gem that no one knows about.

Also on the program are sessions at Hudson Crossing Park and the Mabee Farm Historic Site. Although many courses are full, Talmadge recommends anyone interested check online at canals.ny.gov/onthecanals for openings.

She hopes the sessions will inspire others to keep painting.

“People always tell me, when I have my taste and painting classes, or now with the outdoors, ‘I have no talent. I can’t draw a stick figure. And once they come in a class and they do it, 99% of people say, “Oh my god, I did so much better than I thought. . . . That’s as much [about] art because it’s about recreation and fun, and trying something new. If a few people start doing it on their own, even painting their house, that’s something I feel like I’ve helped.

This has already happened with some students who have attended the sessions.

“A lady said she hadn’t painted for eight years since her father’s death. Another woman hadn’t painted in about 15 years because she had never found anything she wanted to paint, but they really enjoyed the peace and quiet of the painting and its calm,” said said Talmadge.

Beyond the outdoor sessions, the On the Canals program offers statewide excursions, including guided paddle/pedal tours with Upstate Kayak Rentals in Halfmoon; and historic canal cruises in Herkimer, among many others. For more information, go to canals.ny.gov/onthecanals.

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Categories: Art, Life and Arts


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